Worrying statistics for us all – Monsanto hit again and serves them right

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From time to time, I’m so shocked by statistics that are presented to me in the newspapers that I want to cut out the article but where would I store them. If I did that every time, my rooms would be full of piles of paper.

At first I read that Monsanto had been hammered again with a $1 billion suit for a group of people who exposed themselves to Roundup and consequently suffered from cancer. Beyer must be regretting the day they took over Monsanto.

Anyway, now about more national things. The heading in my paper caught my eye “lack of savings leaves one in four in UK facing severe financial difficulty”.
One in four people in the UK would run out of money in less than a month if they relied solely on their savings to cover their outgoings, research suggests.
Just over a quarter of people surveyed by Yorkshire Building Society said that they would fall into debt within weeks if they suffered an income shocks such as job loss.More shockingly, one in six of those polled admitted to having no savings at all.
Two in five of those earning more than £100,000 a year said that without a job they would not be able to cope financially for longer than three months, compared with 48% of workers at the bottom end of the pay scale earning less than £15,000 a year.
While it can be hard for people to put money away, we mustn’t overlook the social pressures people come under to spend rather than save.
This shows how many people must remain in their jobs because they cannot afford to give the jobs up.

I believe that many people are virtual slaves working on national minimum wage so really giving job statistics about the percentage of people employed doesn’t really mean much.

I also read in the same newspaper in the Department for the blindingly obvious “Being at one with nature for two hours a week boosts health”. Spending at least two hours each week in nature may be a crucial threshold promoting health and well-being according to a study. Researchers found that people who spend 120 min in nature each week are significantly more likely to report good health and higher psychological well-being than those who do not visit nature during an average week. Experts say that taking a walk in the woods, listening to birdsong, looking around and engaging with nature lowers stress and blood pressure.
Last year, NHS Shetland became the first organisation to start prescribing nature walks to patients

I would have thought this is the place least likely to have to propose such a thing since Shetland is one of the most beautiful country places in the UK. When the London Borough of Lambeth in London makes a similar recommendation then I would start to get excited. If people can’t go on country walks then at least they should get an allotment.

The fact that such articles have to be written in tall is a condemnation of us all as we have mostly lost our connection to mother nature.